First trad bow help!

Mdfowlman2

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I’m looking to jump into the trad world, this will be for hunting. I do a ton of archery hunting for whitetails and Sika but I’m looking to make it more interesting
I have done a decent bit of digging and looking at bow options, I really like the satori and the samick discovery, I’m torn on draw weight though, i was thinking getting around 50lbs. Unfortunately I don’t have any shops local that carry traditional bows and I don’t know anyone that shoots them so I have to kinda take a chance and order one.
Any help is much appreciated
 

CamoPirate

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I have the Samick discovery riser, started training with 22 lb Galaxy Bronze Star limbs and my 45 lb Uukha natures arrive tomorrow.

IMO, ILF is the way to go if you want to hunt. I'd go the Discovery riser and limbs of your choice if you decide on the ILF route. ILF lets you go up and down in draw weights without buying a whole new bow. Which if you're trying to build up the technique and form, would be beneficial.
 

Deerscat

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Ilf is a good start. That way you can upgrade limbs. 50 lbs limbs is a lot of weight starting off. I would suggest that u start off with a set of cheap 30 pound limbs till you get the form down then get u some nice hunting weight limbs.
 

Felix40

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Everyone is going to suggest super light limbs. If you are shooting 70 pounds easily I don’t think you would be overbowed with 45-50 pounds. I started with 50 pounds when I was a skinny kid in high school. To me it’s just not worth starting super low. It will only take a couple weeks for most guys to outgrow 30 pounds.

Buying used will save you money. And you can trade around bows if you find that you don’t like what you pick first.
 
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Mdfowlman2

Mdfowlman2

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Ilf is a good start. That way you can upgrade limbs. 50 lbs limbs is a lot of weight starting off. I would suggest that u start off with a set of cheap 30 pound limbs till you get the form down then get u some nice hunting weight limbs.
Everyone is going to suggest super light limbs. If you are shooting 70 pounds easily I don’t think you would be overbowed with 45-50 pounds. I started with 50 pounds when I was a skinny kid in high school. To me it’s just not worth starting super low. It will only take a couple weeks for most guys to outgrow 30 pounds.
Zero issue pulling 70, I could pull a lot more but no need for it. I want a weight that I’m not going to outgrow quickly but also one that won’t hinder me during the beggining learning process.
 

MontanaMarine

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I've got a Samick Discovery, and two sets of limbs, 30# and 45#. With my 32" draw length, they get good speeds.

I shoot the 30# a lot more than the 45#, it's just a great way to put in lots of arrows without stressing the shoulders too much. If you are young and strong you probably won't have any shoulder issues, but I'll be hitting 60 in a few weeks....

I picked up my riser and limbs from Alternative in the UK. Great prices, and they ship fast, like delivered in 48 hours via UPS.

 

DEW0341

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Keep in mind your draw length, your limbs will stack past 28”. I started with #40 limbs, now I’m 3 years into it, have MUCH better form thanks to SOLID archery mechanics w/ tom Clum sr and at 32” those same limbs pull #52. I’m 6’5” and I started with a 62” bow. Not bad but as my form got better I started realizing I needed a longer bow for sure. So keep that in mind maybe you are tall guy maybe not. Keep an eye out on the market place over on TT and trad gang forums. I picked up some like new barely used trad tech black max 2.0 limbs for 80$ when I got into ILF. I use those to tink around with and now I mainly shoot some uukha limbs. May be my personal bias but if I was you I would factor the SOLID archery mechanics course into your budget. It’s money well spent.


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Beendare

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Ilf is a good start. That way you can upgrade limbs. 50 lbs limbs is a lot of weight starting off. I would suggest that u start off with a set of cheap 30 pound limbs till you get the form down then get u some nice hunting weight limbs.
I would agree. There is some good sticky threads on how to start over in the traditional section of archery talk. Solid info.

Archery is not a strength contest. It is in accuracy contest. Your 70 pound compound is only holding approximately 14 pounds at full draw. More than tripling that at full draw is a bit of a leap.

What happens when you start with too much weight is you develop bad habits. Those habits are very hard to break down the road. The other thing that happens is you’re putting an incredible amount of stress on the small muscle groups in your shoulder.

The large muscles can take it it’s those small muscles around your rotator cuff that struggle.

The main reason for starting with less weight is so that you can develop good alignment and good form with muscle memory.

FWIW, I shoot tournaments and such and run into a lot of guys that brag about shooting heavy bows and typically they have the worst form and accuracy. Many of those heavy bow guys snap shoot, which means they never really develop a solid shot sequence and aim properly.

Fact- Snap shooting is always less accurate. Try throwing your rifle up to your eye and shooting as soon as the the butt hits your shoulder. Then pull the rifle up and go through your shot sequence and see which is more accurate. Thats essentially what these snap shooters are doing....along with conditioning their brain to snap off a shot as soon as they are on target which of course creates the dreaded target panic that has wrecked many archers.

I am not trying to be critical of those guys-different strokes and all- but almost none of them place very high in any kind of a tournament Which tells you they are not as accurate shooting that way.

Start light- grin

...
 
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Billy Goat

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I'd echo a lot of what Beendare says. Easy to get overbowed, and the problem I have is my release form is pretty terrible but heavier poundage hides it. I would be ahead if I had practiced a better release on a lighter bow. I can draw, anchor, and hold fine. It's the release that can get me, I start waving. When I shoot lightweight it really comes out.

I'll post something I posted before in a different thread. I know several guys shooting this setup:

Check out the galaxy salvo 17" ilf riser that lancaster is selling. Pair it with the black max 2.0 wood carbon tradtech limbs. By far the best bang for your buck ilf setup I have seen. It's good quality components.

$180 for the riser
$250 limbs


Depending on how far you want to travel you could probably have that setup in your hands to try. And a Satori. Either down here in VA, or go to Lancaster archery itself and try.
 
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Mdfowlman2

Mdfowlman2

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I'd echo a lot of what Beendare says. Easy to get overbowed, and the problem I have is my release form is pretty terrible but heavier poundage hides it. I would be ahead if I had practiced a better release on a lighter bow. I can draw, anchor, and hold fine. It's the release that can get me, I start waving. When I shoot lightweight it really comes out.

I'll post something I posted before in a different thread. I know several guys shooting this setup:

Check out the galaxy salvo 17" ilf riser that lancaster is selling. Pair it with the black max 2.0 wood carbon tradtech limbs. By far the best bang for your buck ilf setup I have seen. It's good quality components.

$180 for the riser
$250 limbs


Depending on how far you want to travel you could probably have that setup in your hands to try. And a Satori. Either down here in VA, or go to Lancaster archery itself and try.
Are the carbon limbs worth the extra $100 iver the wood/glass
 

sneaky

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Everyone is going to suggest super light limbs. If you are shooting 70 pounds easily I don’t think you would be overbowed with 45-50 pounds. I started with 50 pounds when I was a skinny kid in high school. To me it’s just not worth starting super low. It will only take a couple weeks for most guys to outgrow 30 pounds.

Buying used will save you money. And you can trade around bows if you find that you don’t like what you pick first.
You never outgrow the light limbs. They are the best way to work on form issues, and to warm up after long layoffs. I wish I had a couple more light sets laying around.

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sneaky

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Keep in mind your draw length, your limbs will stack past 28”. I started with #40 limbs, now I’m 3 years into it, have MUCH better form thanks to SOLID archery mechanics w/ tom Clum sr and at 32” those same limbs pull #52. I’m 6’5” and I started with a 62” bow. Not bad but as my form got better I started realizing I needed a longer bow for sure. So keep that in mind maybe you are tall guy maybe not. Keep an eye out on the market place over on TT and trad gang forums. I picked up some like new barely used trad tech black max 2.0 limbs for 80$ when I got into ILF. I use those to tink around with and now I mainly shoot some uukha limbs. May be my personal bias but if I was you I would factor the SOLID archery mechanics course into your budget. It’s money well spent.


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Don't forget the Leatherwall classifieds

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sneaky

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Are the carbon limbs worth the extra $100 iver the wood/glass
They are a good compromise between the wood/glass and the carbon/foam limbs. For initial practice the wood/ glass are hard to beat for the money.

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Felix40

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You never outgrow the light limbs. They are the best way to work on form issues, and to warm up after long layoffs. I wish I had a couple more light sets laying around.

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Agree to disagree I guess. To me it would just be another bow to set up and tune. I would rather just have one setup that I am extremely comfortable with that I can keep dialed. Switching around bows all the time only makes me more inconsistent.
 

Billy Goat

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Are the carbon limbs worth the extra $100 iver the wood/glass


I think they are. I haven't bothered to shoot them thru a chrono to determine any difference in them, they just feel smoother and well above their price range. I actually prefer the setup I listed to the Satori. Those carbon trad techs are just really good limbs for the money. They feel better to me than some of the foams I have shot.
 

Beendare

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Are the carbon limbs worth the extra $100 iver the wood/glass
I have shot probably 20 different ILF limbs....but not those specific ones. The TT limbs are rebranded, they used to be made by Samick...not sure who now...so you do pay a little bit more for no more performance.

My take;

What happens with these ILF limbs is that once you get to the $200/$300 range for limbs, paying more -sometimes a lot more- will you get a little bit of incremental performance. I can tell you its hard to tell the difference between a WNS Motive C5 limb at $200 and one 2x or 3x more unless you have shot a lot. [BTW, those are my pick for best bang for the buck]

I happen to like the Carbon/Foam just slightly over the Carbon/Wood vs any fiberglass. The Carbon slings a heavy hunting arrow well.

All of the fiberglass limbs will be less reactive....and a little slower partially due to them being less reactive and partially because the cheaper limbs are typically heavier. The carbon/Foam limbs do have a little different sound to them....not louder...but a slight ping.

Everyone will come away from these limbs with a different take...thats mine.

_____
 

Kentucky

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50# is too much for beginners..hard to get very many good reps with those heavy limbs.. max I would go is 40#.. Those TT 2.0 for 150$ are the best new limb money you can spend.. yes uukhas feel better..But you could go you entire archery career and not shoot anything any better that discovery riser and TT2.0 glass/wood.. yes there are faster limbs, yes there are risers that “feel” better than others..but as far as getting it done.. that would do it..

Oh BTW... single string archery is not a buy once cry once sport.. whoever told you that is a damn liar.
 

Justin.Medcalf

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Get a 19 inch ilf riser and 30lb limbs and start working on form. Anything above 30 is just going to make bad habits and a medium length riser will help with consistent shots.
 
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