Hilly Trail Runs

bounds

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Jul 5, 2012
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Pineywoods - Cleveland, TX
Hey guys,

I know a number of you are pretty dialed when it comes to trail running in the hills/mountains. I'm able to do that regularly now and am just starting to do it consistently. I run a few miles a few days a week already but mostly on flat ground. I'm 5'11'' and 160 lbs, so in pretty good shape to run. What are some of the best tips/best advice you can give for starting to transition to a lot more hills? Thanks!
 

Travis Bertrand

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Mar 9, 2012
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Reno,NV
Put one foot In front of the other at a quick pace;). It's the same as running on flat ground just running up and down hills. You might want to get a good pair of trail shoes as well. Oh buy a dog, they love running in the hills!
 

Lukem

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Mar 1, 2012
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Nebraska
Depending on what your goals are, adding a hill climb as part of a speed workout is pretty killer. I have a 3/4 mile climb of about 500' that is pretty brutal for repeats.

My other advice on running hills is to learn to run down hills. Most people tend to lean back and throw on the brakes going down, that's a surefire way to get sore. Lean forward, watch where you put your feet and let 'em fly. It'll take a lot of practice to not kill yourself.
 

2rocky

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Jun 21, 2012
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Nor Cal
My other advice on running hills is to learn to run down hills. Most people tend to lean back and throw on the brakes going down, that's a surefire way to get sore. Lean forward, watch where you put your feet and let 'em fly. It'll take a lot of practice to not kill yourself.

Good advice here.

I'd say don't get too hung up on running uphill. If you have to walk , then power walk. Relentless forward motion is the key. Sometimes the walk lets your legs recover so you can bomb the downhills.
There are going to be stretches you Can Not run. Don't sweat it. when you get to that smooth stretch of single track you can really open it up and it feels like you are flying.


One thing different about trails is you might find yourself taking shorter faster strides, especially in rocky sections. if you catch a toe or slip on mud you aren't putting all your weight on that one foot.

One think I like about trail running is that toughness counts for something. You are gonna fall, you are gonna get dirty.

You also can stop and appreciate your surroundings. In fact I encourage you to do that. There is no one timing you. If you aren't appreciating your surroundings then you are running too hard.

Oh yeah, Wet Ones singles. Lifesavers in the woods. Trust me.
 
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