Rok Blog: Too Nostalgic?

twall13

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
1,714
Location
Utah
I really enjoyed the film as well. Reaffirms that I'll never be a big buck hunter cause I would have tagged out on one of the "smaller" deer you passed up. It's still fun to watch the #Legend at work chasing the big bucks. I learned a lot and enjoyed my time in the process.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 
OP
robby denning

robby denning

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
9,638
Location
SE Idaho
I really enjoyed the film as well. Reaffirms that I'll never be a big buck hunter cause I would have tagged out on one of the "smaller" deer you passed up. It's still fun to watch the #Legend at work chasing the big bucks. I learned a lot and enjoyed my time in the process.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
Hey thanks man. Appreciate you watching the film.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

wyo2track

Member
Joined
Sep 9, 2015
Messages
73
Location
western WY
Back when I was in high school or middle school, I remember my dad bringing this book home one evening back around 1989-90. If I remember correctly, Jay didn't seem like much of a high mountain hunter, but really liked the low land hunting, especially the sage country of Nevada, back when tags where a little easier to come by. This book, and Kirt Darners book, though the latter is not exactly role model material, are two books I remember the most from 30 & 40 years ago.
 
OP
robby denning

robby denning

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
9,638
Location
SE Idaho
Back when I was in high school or middle school, I remember my dad bringing this book home one evening back around 1989-90. If I remember correctly, Jay didn't seem like much of a high mountain hunter, but really liked the low land hunting, especially the sage country of Nevada, back when tags where a little easier to come by. This book, and Kirt Darners book, though the latter is not exactly role model material, are two books I remember the most from 30 & 40 years ago.
Good to hear there’s a couple of us old guys out there that remember all this stuff! Thanks for chiming in man


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Howard Mee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 17, 2016
Messages
162
Location
Montana
That's pretty kool. I have a PILE of old magazines that my grandma used as inspiration for painting wildlife. Vintage, old school magazines. I haven't looked through most of them since I was 9-10. Probably worth dusting them off and giving them a re-read. Thanks for the review
 
OP
robby denning

robby denning

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
9,638
Location
SE Idaho
That's pretty kool. I have a PILE of old magazines that my grandma used as inspiration for painting wildlife. Vintage, old school magazines. I haven't looked through most of them since I was 9-10. Probably worth dusting them off and giving them a re-read. Thanks for the review
I like that old stuff. Hunting's changed (like everything) and it's goo to see where it was in yesteryear.
 

Brettmufc7

Newbie
Joined
Jan 31, 2020
Messages
4
Hey Roksliders,
Be sure and check out our blog, The Rok Blog, hosted by yours truly.
This is one more resource for information on gear and hunting (especially for Mule Deer) for our Rokslide members. Make sure you subscribe once you're there (top right of the blog page) and give us your comments/feedback in the comment section after the blog.
Look forward to seeing you there:
Rok Blog - Rokslide
Awesome !!!
 

ntrlbrnhunter

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2019
Messages
184
Hey man. So you think bucks on winter range year round is more common now?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
It might be the way I approach it as of late, but I believe some the best QUALITY lives on the winter range or low elevation areas. Especially in the OTC, easy draw stuff I’m hunting.

The biggest and I believe the oldest buck I have taken, (I didn’t know I could lab age back then lol) lived year around in a 3-4 square mile area on winter range. The buck lived on BLM sage country covered in little two track roads in an OTC unit. I just think 99.9% of people drove by him for years (including me). This buck actually gained elevation to winter (I picked his sheds up higher in elevation than where I killed him) . Once i figured him out he still took years to get killed. Quite amazing. I witnessed him do things I didn’t think possible.

I do not believe this buck would have survived if he had lived at higher elevations where people are hunting hard. I could be wrong.

That big 3 year old I killed a few seasons ago, also summered on winter range the year I killed him. The year prior he summered higher, why he moved lower that year I do not know.

Another recent example that comes to mind is the Gil Roden buck. IMO it is the most impressive deer to come out of Wyoming in the past 10 years. Gil killed him, hard horned with a bow in the sage brush lowlands last fall. That buck is a gagger. Imo no way that buck would have survived in the high country now days.

I think guys are getting good, and winter range is somewhat like the thick conifer/aspen zone that has produced quality so well for me. I guess what I’m saying is I think the best quality is in overlooked areas especially as of late. I haven’t seen a giant in the high country for years, and the winter range is just one more spot that I think is getting missed and holds a few treasures.
 
OP
robby denning

robby denning

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
9,638
Location
SE Idaho
It might be the way I approach it as of late, but I believe some the best QUALITY lives on the winter range or low elevation areas. Especially in the OTC, easy draw stuff I’m hunting.

The biggest and I believe the oldest buck I have taken, (I didn’t know I could lab age back then lol) lived year around in a 3-4 square mile area on winter range. The buck lived on BLM sage country covered in little two track roads in an OTC unit. I just think 99.9% of people drove by him for years (including me). This buck actually gained elevation to winter (I picked his sheds up higher in elevation than where I killed him) . Once i figured him out he still took years to get killed. Quite amazing. I witnessed him do things I didn’t think possible.

I do not believe this buck would have survived if he had lived at higher elevations where people are hunting hard. I could be wrong.

That big 3 year old I killed a few seasons ago, also summered on winter range the year I killed him. The year prior he summered higher, why he moved lower that year I do not know.

Another recent example that comes to mind is the Gil Roden buck. IMO it is the most impressive deer to come out of Wyoming in the past 10 years. Gil killed him, hard horned with a bow in the sage brush lowlands last fall. That buck is a gagger. Imo no way that buck would have survived in the high country now days.

I think guys are getting good, and winter range is somewhat like the thick conifer/aspen zone that has produced quality so well for me. I guess what I’m saying is I think the best quality is in overlooked areas especially as of late. I haven’t seen a giant in the high country for years, and the winter range is just one more spot that I think is getting missed and holds a few treasures.
Thanks Travis, I remember that giant buck you’re talking about that you took a few years back. I had forgotten about him until you posted this, so there’s one more example of a giant buck living low.

I think I know which Wyoming buck you’re talking about the guy got with his bow, I will see if I can find it. I didn’t really know the backstory on it. But there’s another one. Thanks man
 
Last edited:

willfrye027

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2018
Messages
776
Some of my friends hunt winter range in California general zones. They go days or weeks without seeing a single deer, let alone a buck. But they’ve killed green scored 160in deer in California doing it. I don’t have the patience for that style of hunting and not many do. Which is probably why those deer survived to maturity in small zones with a gazillion tags.
 

Howard Mee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 17, 2016
Messages
162
Location
Montana
For what it’s worth... a little diff styling habitat here in NW MT but it happens here too. The bucks push out to winter range. Then migrate back and disperse in the spring. But not all bucks disperse. My best buck never left the “winter range” ( for lack of a better term). I have a t cam pic of him from the year before in the summer. I also have seen his sheds from the year before. And I know where he was when I killed him in Nov. about a 1-2 mile triangle. Prob not the norm here but it adds to conversation. Not all bucks leave...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
OP
robby denning

robby denning

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
9,638
Location
SE Idaho
Some of my friends hunt winter range in California general zones. They go days or weeks without seeing a single deer, let alone a buck. But they’ve killed green scored 160in deer in California doing it. I don’t have the patience for that style of hunting and not many do. Which is probably why those deer survived to maturity in small zones with a gazillion tags.
🙏👍
 
OP
robby denning

robby denning

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
9,638
Location
SE Idaho
For what it’s worth... a little diff styling habitat here in NW MT but it happens here too. The bucks push out to winter range. Then migrate back and disperse in the spring. But not all bucks disperse. My best buck never left the “winter range” ( for lack of a better term). I have a t cam pic of him from the year before in the summer. I also have seen his sheds from the year before. And I know where he was when I killed him in Nov. about a 1-2 mile triangle. Prob not the norm here but it adds to conversation. Not all bucks leave...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I know what you mean up there Howard, it’s not classic winter range, but it sounds like the principal still the same with some bucks. Thanks for chiming in man.
 
Top