Trekking Poles

shaun

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2012
Messages
1,492
Location
Central CA
I use Easton trekking poles and I love them the top two portions are carbon fiber and the bottom section is aluminum. I have no acl or Plc left in my leg so I use them whenever I have a good load on my back makes a huge difference
 

Aron Snyder

2
Rokslide Sponsor
Joined
Jan 23, 2012
Messages
5,014
Location
The Wilderness
I always bring at least 1 with me, mostly when hauling heavy loads and coming down steep inclines. The also hold up my tarp.
 

Arrowslinger

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2012
Messages
597
Location
NorCal
I'm faster climbing with them, using my upper body to help move momentum forward by pushing off...downhills i find no benefit unless its technical, then it gives you more points on contact with the ground. I always take'em!
 

Ross

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 24, 2012
Messages
3,963
Location
Liberty Lake, WA
I'm partial to the Black Diamond Zpoles.....my set come in a 9.5 ounces and they collapse down to 15.6 inches, so they easily fit in most packs. They can also be used to set up a tarp. They are one size and do not accept a snow basket, but otherwise money well spent. Having had 10 knee surgeries on one knee, I am now using these little guys religiously to take the strain off the knees while in the mountains.
 

RosinBag

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
3,089
Location
Roseville, CA.
I use mine just like Arrowslinger, with the exception Iuse them on most downhills when I have heavy loads. It helps slow me down, if not I will get going and end up out of control until I crash...
 

flytrait

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2012
Messages
111
Location
spokane, wa
I'm faster climbing with them, using my upper body to help move momentum forward by pushing off...downhills i find no benefit unless its technical, then it gives you more points on contact with the ground. I always take'em!

I experienced the same results that they help in climbing. I actually use mine as much as possible as we are usually trying to cover as much country as we can. The extra points of contact really help as I used to have to find limbs and etc. to hang on to so I don't go sliding down the mountian. I aslo find that I can go further for longer as well. For me it was best money spent for 2012. Black Diamond carbon fiber
 

Slim Jim

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2012
Messages
2,320
Location
Las Vegas, NV
Always use them on pack in and out. Helps out on the knees and four points of contact. On one of my scouting trips this summer, I had to cross a huge steep and long boulder field with a heavy pack on. Without them, I don't think that I would of crossed it. I was scared that the poles were going to collapse the whole time so I tried not to keep to much weight on them

Easton's 2 piece @ 1lb for the pair
 

Ozz08

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2012
Messages
423
Location
Castle Rock, CO
I started using some clearance rei brand this past year and found they really help my knees and ankles on the downhills. They slow me down and help keep me under control. I also like them on the uphill climbs. Not only do I feel a benefit physically but psychologically as well. They serve as a distraction to me when on long steep inclines and take my mind off of the work(only a little but enough). I used to play a similar mind game when running. I have always been a good athlete and good runner but to this day I HATE running so I started dribbling a basketball while I ran. I would totally forget I was running and before I knew it I would have my 5-8 miles in and done.
 

RockChucker30

Senior Member
Rokslide Sponsor
Joined
Mar 30, 2012
Messages
729
Location
Working
I don't like them while hunting but do like at least one packing in or out. Black Diamond's with the flick lock are the best I've used.
 

CrzyTrekker

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2012
Messages
725
Location
San Luis Valley, Colorado
Like 'em a lot when backpacking or meat hauling, especially off-trail. Great for stream crossings. Occasionally use them to set up my shelter in lieu of a pole. Never carry them while hunting. Currently using Komperdell carbon fibers, I think.
 

gobbler1662

Senior Member
Joined
May 31, 2012
Messages
1,179
Location
Prineville, Oregon
After knee surgery last winter I am now using trekking poles. There was an article in backpacker magazine several months ago about the benefits of trekking poles on the knees and also stability on steep terrain. I use the black diamond carbon trekking poles, they cost a bit more but they are super lightweight. Works great when I get to my bivy site I don't have to look for branches to set up my para-tarp.
 
S

Salmo-Priest

Guest
Stoney Point monopod is the only way I go about it. First and foremost mine have been bullet proff. Can shoot of the Yoke. But the thing i like the best is how well i can rest/stablize my binoculars on the yoke. I've yet to meet anyone without a rest that can glass longer and more comfortable than me when I use them. Once 6 hrs of glassing produced a 190" gross muley buck. I have never seen him had I not been able to glass so long. The Explorer makes a great staff/pole for my Six Moons shelter. I hunt with one. Travel with two. There are accesories but the Yoke is all i've tried.

http://www.stoneypoint.com/products/mp_explorer_monopod.html
 

jmez

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2012
Messages
6,174
Location
Piedmont, SD
Black Diamond Trail Ergo Cork. Use them packing in and out. Don't use them while hunting. They help a bunch when packing a load, even on flat, even ground.
 

slim9300

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
1,568
Location
Olympia, WA
I'm partial to the Black Diamond Zpoles.....my set come in a 9.5 ounces and they collapse down to 15.6 inches, so they easily fit in most packs. They can also be used to set up a tarp. They are one size and do not accept a snow basket, but otherwise money well spent. Having had 10 knee surgeries on one knee, I am now using these little guys religiously to take the strain off the knees while in the mountains.

^^^ This.

I thank my purchase of these poles to Aron. For years I made fun of 'Quiche-eaters' that used trekking poles. Then Aron's advice made me rethink my preconceived notion. This year I packed out my first 120+ load with a trekking pole (I wish I had both on my bull but I gave one to my partner) and the difference is amazing. Packing out half of my partner's bull two days later I had the chance to see what 120+ lbs. felt like with two poles and no bow. Man was it nice compared to the alternative. No slipping and falling going downhill. Much less knee pain afterwards. Much less fatigue while climbing. The list of benefits goes on. Apparently now I'm a quiche-eater too. SOB.

At 10.5 ounces with the case I will always carry these poles with me in my pack for when an animal hits the ground. The 130cm ones that I have work perfectly with my Mega Tarp too.

Keep in mind that you have to baby the poles a little bit compared to the much heavier aluminum ones. They will eventually break if you fall on them with all your weight. I did find that REI will give you a new pair for free if you snap them and explain what happened.

Here's the BD Carbon Z-pole in action this year.

vuruda5a.jpg
 
Top