Want to hunt and camp in Alaska.

AK Troutbum

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2012
Messages
6,396
Location
Chugiak, Alaska
Are you planning on working at all, or do you have a large enough nest egg saved up to support yourself while up here? I'll say it again, hunting in Alaska as a non-resident is not cheap even if you're planning on only hunting areas that are easily accessible (also get tons of pressure). Keep in mind that Alaska is more than twice the size of Texas, yet has the least amount of roads of any state in the US, so if you can get there via road, atv, etc., you're going to have company and probably a lot of it. If you're thinking about getting to anything remote, and not have to deal with tons of hunting pressure, it's going to be much more expensive.
 

Bighorner

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2017
Messages
209
I really cant tell if this is for real or a prank, but I would suggest taking a week or two and doing some backpacking in a western state with the gear set up you plan to use as a dry run before committing to alaska. Even if it's just on your way to alaska. There is no substitute for experience. Good luck.
 

cod007

Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2017
Messages
59
A 34 yr old healthy male coming to Ak to live The Dream? I say, go for it dude! Sounds a little bit familiar, to me.
AR restrictions at the border need to be considered but I don’t think the AR is such a bad choice overall if only one gun is the only option. (And just one gun does not have to be one’s only option, in reality.)
If the OP has any trades experience or, heck, for that matter, any work ethic at all in life, he can be successful here in Ak.
The hunting experiences are fabulous in Ak as are the fishing possibilities.
There are empty shacks, cabins and shelters scattered all over this state. A resourceful young man can squat, barter, negotiate, etc, all sorts of situations that will work for all involved.
My take on this is that the OP wants an Alaskan experience that ‘includes’ hunting opportunities because that’s what many young men dream of. Seems to me he should be cut some slack for not putting his mind full of dreams before this audience all at one time.
 

Bighorse

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2012
Messages
434
Location
SE Alaska
There's a huge difference between a hunting expedition and homesteading. Yes, a homesteader will procure game, wood, materials, ect........in the pursuit of safety and sustenance. A hunter will procure game.

The distinction is important. A homesteader is creating a lifestyle. A hunter is creating a steak.

A steak is inexpensive and short lived. A home is expensive and long lived.

The distinction is important.

Your dialog can be adjusted to gain focus is what folks are saying. Just like your shot can be focused to gain effectiveness (IE using a .223) you get the concept.

Your enthusiasm is appreciated, albeit ineffective.

Alaskans make shit happen! We talk with purpose and keep it real.

Get up here and pursue the dream. Time will teach and temper and you just may have a fine future, Cheechakoo.
 

Bigcat_hunter

Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2015
Messages
86
Living in Alaska always seemed like a dream to me because the lack of people and hunting opportunities. After watching a lot of hunting shows it seems like you have to travel far to find animals. Low animal density in such a big area would be frustrating to me unless I owned a plane. Also on some of those hunting shows they have mosquitoes as big as magpies. Thats no bueno.
 

Marbles

Senior Member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,221
Location
AK
Joke responses aren't going to be taken seriously by somebody asking serious questions. I think anybody who can carry a conversation understands that. I've thanked those who give helpful responses. Open to hearing anything objectively. So long as it's constructive. But I've learned some ppl love to have a Boogeyman or something to criticize, and that's ok too.

The parcel of land probably won't be big enough to hunt, so looking into public lands to hunt on. Electricity, permanent structure, and hunting/processing larger animals are part of a long term plan.

So, serious response.

The AR is too powerful to be great for small game from a meat perspective (the squirrels up here are little more than chipmunks) and not powerful enough to drop larger animals reliably without perfect shot placement. Plus, quality ARs are also heavy, the skeletonized ones are range toys.

Bring a 22 rimfire for a rifle and a 454 wheel gun. The set up can come in lighter than a good AR and gives a much larger set of capabilities. Say a Tactical Solutions Backpacker and a Ruger Toklat for 6.7 pounds. Order a Bowen Arms Rough Country sight today (long lead time) as Rugers factory rear sight is utter garbage.

There was a native woman who DLP'd a big bear with a 22 hornet. There was also a guy on Kodiak that killed one with a knife. But, those are spectacular exceptions. The story of Old Groanner gives a better idea of how being under gunned tends to end.

100 miles solo, on foot off trail is no small undertaking, and that is with good health and good equipment and good weather and over good country.

I have not seen anyone say to stay out of AK, but lots of hints to change your plans regarding how you do it. I say get a job, spend a year up here to become a resident, then if the homesteading idea still appeals to you, go for it.

I would go for some place south of the Alaska Range and preferably close to the coast. Better food options and warmer weather in winter.

If you just want to spend time in AK, come up in the summer. Hunt small game, go for a haul road Caribou in August, hunt September deer in PWS or on the Kenia. Perhaps take an alpine black bear. Just remember you have to have a way of salvaging all the meat. Though there is a donation program that would keep you legal and spare the need for cold storage and transport.

Those three will put you at $1,560 in non-resident tags and license. $45 if you live up here for a year and become a resident.

A bow would let you hunt haul road Caribou right off the road, but going in 5 miles to hunt with a gun is no big deal for someone who can cover 100 miles, so skip the addition of a bow, it will add even more complexity to your kit than a handgun.

Skip driving through Canada with any gun. Take the ferry or ship it to yourself. Of course, the ferry may not be an option given the current state of things.

Edit: You can ship via Lynden and pick it up at the port.

Screenshot_20210712-130107_Adobe Acrobat.jpg
 
OP
I

iHunt20

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2021
Messages
19
So, serious response.

The AR is too powerful to be great for small game from a meat perspective (the squirrels up here are little more than chipmunks) and not powerful enough to drop larger animals reliably without perfect shot placement. Plus, quality ARs are also heavy, the skeletonized ones are range toys.

Bring a 22 rimfire for a rifle and a 454 wheel gun. The set up can come in lighter than a good AR and gives a much larger set of capabilities. Say a Tactical Solutions Backpacker and a Ruger Toklat for 6.7 pounds. Order a Bowen Arms Rough Country sight today (long lead time) as Rugers factory rear sight is utter garbage.

There was a native woman who DLP'd a big bear with a 22 hornet. There was also a guy on Kodiak that killed one with a knife. But, those are spectacular exceptions. The story of Old Groanner gives a better idea of how being under gunned tends to end.

100 miles solo, on foot off trail is no small undertaking, and that is with good health and good equipment and good weather and over good country.

I have not seen anyone say to stay out of AK, but lots of hints to change your plans regarding how you do it. I say get a job, spend a year up here to become a resident, then if the homesteading idea still appeals to you, go for it.

I would go for some place south of the Alaska Range and preferably close to the coast. Better food options and warmer weather in winter.

If you just want to spend time in AK, come up in the summer. Hunt small game, go for a haul road Caribou in August, hunt September deer in PWS or on the Kenia. Perhaps take an alpine black bear. Just remember you have to have a way of salvaging all the meat. Though there is a donation program that would keep you legal and spare the need for cold storage and transport.

Those three will put you at $1,560 in non-resident tags and license. $45 if you live up here for a year and become a resident.

A bow would let you hunt haul road Caribou right off the road, but going in 5 miles to hunt with a gun is no big deal for someone who can cover 100 miles, so skip the addition of a bow, it will add even more complexity to your kit than a handgun.

Skip driving through Canada with any gun. Take the ferry or ship it to yourself. Of course, the ferry may not be an option given the current state of things.

Edit: You can ship via Lynden and pick it up at the port.

View attachment 306420
Thanks so much. I will have more questions as time goes on, if you don't mind me messaging you
 

Marbles

Senior Member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,221
Location
AK
Thanks so much. I will have more questions as time goes on, if you don't mind me messaging you

There are lots of people with significantly more experience and knowledge than me on this forum. There are also multiple ways to get things done. You can message me, but will probably get better information if you ask everyone.
 
OP
I

iHunt20

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2021
Messages
19
It's necessary to harvest every ounce of meat, and it should be. I didn't mean any disrespect to any animal or subsistence hunters by implying I wouldn't recover everything. I always do my own processing and do very well.
The normal standard isn't something that should be done on site. It's also better to avoid predator encounters than provoke them. I was trying to balance the risks and the potential experience but it's just unnecessary.

Marbles is right. I should move there first. Not only are nonresident tags substantial, there are many liabilities of hunting without a home shelter to do my own processing. Im used to my home state. There aren't many bear, only some wolves but very, very rarely. It's safe and simple to do a hunting camp here, even for out of state aholes to pay a few bucks to pay somebody else for processing and make the whole thing a big drinking and shooting party.

I hoped to explore it by feel before deciding to move up there. Such a big state. Would be expensive to really "try out" a lot of it. Would have to visit an area only once to see if I like it and go from there. I'm stuck on visiting coastal places (seem to have less public hunting areas and more restrictions.. and coastal floods are a real risk for a while worldwide) or above the range, where the remote places with no property taxes, no homeowners association, no local government even exists. Game would be plentiful but that degree of freedom comes with the responsibility of having nobody else for anything. Complete sufficiency. I seek it but it makes somebody realize that nobody is ever completely prepared and never will have enough of just the right thing. And that's the agreement before diving right in. Can't make decisions like that blindly. Have to visit then move there, get around a little bit and hunt all the things with some familiarity.
 

thinhorn_AK

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
5,637
Location
Alaska
It's necessary to harvest every ounce of meat, and it should be. I didn't mean any disrespect to any animal or subsistence hunters by implying I wouldn't recover everything. I always do my own processing and do very well.
The normal standard isn't something that should be done on site. It's also better to avoid predator encounters than provoke them. I was trying to balance the risks and the potential experience but it's just unnecessary.

Marbles is right. I should move there first. Not only are nonresident tags substantial, there are many liabilities of hunting without a home shelter to do my own processing. Im used to my home state. There aren't many bear, only some wolves but very, very rarely. It's safe and simple to do a hunting camp here, even for out of state aholes to pay a few bucks to pay somebody else for processing and make the whole thing a big drinking and shooting party.

I hoped to explore it by feel before deciding to move up there. Such a big state. Would be expensive to really "try out" a lot of it. Would have to visit an area only once to see if I like it and go from there. I'm stuck on visiting coastal places (seem to have less public hunting areas and more restrictions.. and coastal floods are a real risk for a while worldwide) or above the range, where the remote places with no property taxes, no homeowners association, no local government even exists. Game would be plentiful but that degree of freedom comes with the responsibility of having nobody else for anything. Complete sufficiency. I seek it but it makes somebody realize that nobody is ever completely prepared and never will have enough of just the right thing. And that's the agreement before diving right in. Can't make decisions like that blindly. Have to visit then move there, get around a little bit and hunt all the things with some familiarity.

Ho….leee…..crap…..lol…..
 

cod007

Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2017
Messages
59
....“I hoped to explore it by feel before deciding to move up there. Such a big state. Would be expensive to really "try out" a lot of it. Would have to visit an area only once to see if I like it and go from there. I'm stuck on visiting coastal places (seem to have less public hunting areas and more restrictions.”......

Yeah, here’s some perspective to chew on. One map shows how big Ak is. The other shows our hiway system within the state. Notice all red lines (hiways) are NOT connected?
No one person has seen this entire state.
 

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HuntingIndian

Member
Joined
May 20, 2021
Messages
70
....“I hoped to explore it by feel before deciding to move up there. Such a big state. Would be expensive to really "try out" a lot of it. Would have to visit an area only once to see if I like it and go from there. I'm stuck on visiting coastal places (seem to have less public hunting areas and more restrictions.”......

Yeah, here’s some perspective to chew on. One map shows how big Ak is. The other shows our hiway system within the state. Notice all red lines (hiways) are NOT connected?
No one person has seen this entire state.

dang, its a yuuuuuuuge state.
 
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