Cheapest way to save weight on a backpack hunt!

Aron Snyder

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I haven't been getting on the diet/nutrition forum much as Robby and Les don't need any help, but I did want to throw in some food for thought.

When someone is getting ready for an upcoming mountain hunt they will be looking at an average price of $100 per ounce of weight savings. That's a general rule, but UL gear will definitely put your wallet on a good diet.

With that being said, dropping weight of your butt is a LOT cheaper and it will definitely help you live longer too!

America has an obesity rate much too high and nutrition if often overlooked, so I wanted to post this thread up to give everyone something to think about before dropping $500 on a sleeping bag or pack.

The gym I currently go to costs me $200 per year ($16.66 per month) and if you can average 2 lbs of weight loss per week, that will add up to $2 per lb of weight savings! (I hope I figured that up correctly :)

That's about $98 in price difference when you compare it to buying UL gear, and you'll also get the added bonus of getting around the mountains much easier and faster as well.

So keep your chin up when dieting and exercising because your also dropping pack weight and saving money at the same time.
 

a3dhunter

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Aron, You made that point with me last year and I appreciate it.
Down fifty pounds with more to lose.
Well worth it...to become an animal on the mountain!
Thanks Aron.
 

Ross

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Well said Aron and good work a3dhunter! Our most important asset for our time afield is our body and it is the one thing we can control. We can't control the weather, other hunters, draws, the rut and many other variables. 120 days and counting!
 

luke moffat

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Well said Aron. I have about 10 to lose prior to August to get back to fighting weight, but with longer days and more outings it falls off faster this time of year. :D
 

robby denning

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Great point Aron, and statistically speaking lower body weights (down to about 20 on the BMI) have the lowest disease-related mortality rates.
 

Becca

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Thanks for pointing this our Aron, it had crossed my mind before, but I never actually crunched the numbers. Taking into account the health benefits as Robby pointed out, the savings from a perspective of reduced illness and mortality are pretty staggering.

Plus, I bet one wouldn't notice the extra few pounds for heavier gear nearly as much if they are in rokking shape already :)
 

lorneparker1

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I haven't been getting on the diet/nutrition forum much as Robby and Les don't need any help, but I did want to throw in some food for thought.

When someone is getting ready for an upcoming mountain hunt they will be looking at an average price of $100 per ounce of weight savings. That's a general rule, but UL gear will definitely put your wallet on a good diet.

With that being said, dropping weight of your butt is a LOT cheaper and it will definitely help you live longer too!

America has an obesity rate much too high and nutrition if often overlooked, so I wanted to post this thread up to give everyone something to think about before dropping $500 on a sleeping bag or pack.

The gym I currently go to costs me $200 per year ($16.66 per month) and if you can average 2 lbs of weight loss per week, that will add up to $2 per lb of weight savings! (I hope I figured that up correctly :)

That's about $98 in price difference when you compare it to buying UL gear, and you'll also get the added bonus of getting around the mountains much easier and faster as well.

So keep your chin up when dieting and exercising because your also dropping pack weight and saving money at the same time.

Although i 100% agree with you, that being in shape is crucial, ive heeard this "loosing weight off your gut is the cheapest way to shave pounds off your gear list." I disagree because shaving 10 lbs off your body isnt going to make your pack any lighter. lol. It may feel lighter, but a 2lb sleeping bag is still 2 lbs hahahaha
 

Umpqua Hunter

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The gym I currently go to costs me $200 per year ($16.66 per month) and if you can average 2 lbs of weight loss per week, that will add up to $2 per lb of weight savings! (I hope I figured that up correctly :)

That's about $98 in price difference when you compare it to buying UL gear, and you'll also get the added bonus of getting around the mountains much easier and faster as well.

I completely agree with you, and certainly need to get in better shape myself. But just to throw in a thought....in a purely "financial" analysis...my dad taught me 35 years ago "your time is worth money". That has been a really good principle to keep in mind when making decisions of how to "invest" my time. At this stage of my life I figure my time is worth over $30 an hour. Then there are things that are "priceless", such as time with my wife and kids.
 

herdbull

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Although i 100% agree with you, that being in shape is crucial, ive heeard this "loosing weight off your gut is the cheapest way to shave pounds off your gear list." I disagree because shaving 10 lbs off your body isnt going to make your pack any lighter. lol. It may feel lighter, but a 2lb sleeping bag is still 2 lbs hahahaha

I know you were somewhat joking but another thing to consider here is your total weight with pack and gear. Say you weigh 230lb with a 40lb pack, total gross weight of 270lb. You could spend money till there is no more to get to 250lbs gross weight or just lose 20lbs. The more total gross weight you are the more total gross weight your transferring to the ground with each step. The more total weight the body has to support. Plus once you drop the pack you'll be that much more lighter.

Aron is a perfect example of a guy who was quite a monster a few years but then had to deal with lugging all that weight around the mtn while chasing critters. Plus he had to feed that body too. I bet if you ask him he'll tell you he's way more happier now running down critters on a mtn than he was say 5 years ago.

One must find the right mix of strength, endurance, all around fitness that works for him. While it won't necessarily make the hunt any easier it will sure be more enjoyable.
 

a3dhunter

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I will agree with the above.
A couple seasons ago I hunted at 320 lbs with a 20-30 lb pack, when you talk about moving 350 lbs up a mountain, it is WORK!.
Thne you have little pieces of crap hunting with you who ask why you can't keep up and then threaten to quarter you to get you off the mountain.....when you know you can step over and knock the crap out of them...if you could just catch you're breath!

Is it a lot easier to lose weight and move less mass, than to spend an extra $500 to shave 5 lbs(just a couple items), and an extra $2,000 to shave 10 lbs.(Off sleep system, clothing, and pack).
While I continue to make improvements on my pack system as well, the biggest improvement I can make is with my body.
 

herdbull

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3dhunter,
there is so much truth to what you just said. Most guys don't know until they start to see the light. Then again, it is fun buying new gear.
 

a3dhunter

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3dhunter,
there is so much truth to what you just said. Most guys don't know until they start to see the light. Then again, it is fun buying new gear.

Let's just say those numbers I quoted for weight savings in gear are not made up, it's what I've actually spent (plus some). Buying gear is always fun....but I'm learning to view things differently.
 

philw

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It's a good concept, but I don't believe you can look at it from a strictly financial point of view. As far as where to take the weight off, I think everyone would agree that for best performance, you need to minimize the weight of your gear AND drop unecessary lbs. off your body.

But staying physically fit has so many other benefits that it's a no-brainer even for people who'll never hunt. How can one put a price on living longer, feeling better (physically) and feeling better about yourself? And for aging hunters, it's not only the short term (humping up a mountain on this year's hunt) that generates the payback, it's long-term, being able to hunt like you want to, on foot in the wilderness, for more years.
 

a3dhunter

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I would disagree, when you look at all the choices in gear out there today you can find plenty of gear that will get the job done and be moderately priced.
You can also spend an extra $200 on a sleeping bag to shave off an extra 2 lbs.
or
You can spend $200 on a gym membership and lose 10 lbs (or more).

I would argue that the 10 lbs lost at the gym serve you better than the 2 lbs you saved in your pack cutting from a 4 lb sleeping bag to a 2 lb bag.
Not to mention the strength increase from working out on a regular schedule.

It seems like in this age of new gear and constantly evolving lightweight materials, we forget that hard work pays off the most.

I do agree there should be a balance in all of it though..
 

luke moffat

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I'd say time if more valuable than both. I'd take 10 extra pounds around my gut and 10 in my pack for an extra day in the field away from work. Can't kill critters from work or the gym. :D
 

luke moffat

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and you can go to the gym before and after hunting season.

True, I only work out at the gym during my two weeks at work. :D So I guess that counts. And guys like us with the body build of Olive Oil from Popeye should probably refrain from posting in here. :D
 
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