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Welcome to Rokslide’s blog—the new place to connect with the DIY hunting world.

So what is a blog, really?  A quick Google search nails it:

“A blog is a web site on which an individual or group of users record opinions, information, etc. on a regular basis.”

Simple as that, I guess. 

The Rokslide staff has put months of thought and planning into this project.  While I’m a mule deer hunter at heart and this may set the tone of the blog, it will be more than just mule deer.  Rokslide has attracted many of the top hunters, manufacturers, and writers in the DIY hunting world.   This blog is going to connect you with them and the latest techniques, gear, and hot topics out there, helping you to be a better hunter by this fall! 

However, if you’re a hard-core buck hunter and want to join those who’ve spent decades pursuing one of North America’s greatest trophies, this will be the place for you.  I’ll share never before published details and stories on all of my big mule deer, which at last count is approaching twenty.  But more than just me, we will connect with others who we consider are at the top of their mule-deer game, expanding your learning opportunities.  I guarantee if you’ll stick around, you will become a better buck hunter and a better hunter all-around.

So why a blog hosted by Robby Denning?

The good Lord planted my family right here in good old Southeast Idaho over hundred years ago; I come from a rich heritage of mule deer country and hunters.  My grandpa, father, and three uncles were all buck hunters and I started accompanying them when I was 8 years old. 

Later, as a young man, I became inspired by the great deer hunters and writers of yesteryear.  That spark grew into a wildfire and at age 25, I gave up the pursuit of all other species to hunt big mule deer.  It was a decision I’ll never regret and has allowed me to explore the world of mule deer to a depth only a few modern hunters have. 

I’ve taken four bucks over 200”, two over 220”, and a dozen or more good bucks in the 170-190” class, all on DIY opportunities I created myself while raising a family.  If you’ve got a big mule deer on your life’s “To-Do” list, I can help you accomplish that goal.

I’ve also operated a successful scouting service for 17 years, helping hundreds of other hunters find good places to hunt in Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, and Nevada; In addition, I’ve ran a private land fair-chase outfitting operation since 2001.  These two businesses have helped me further understand what hunters must do to be successful.  I will bring this wealth of experience and more to the Rok Blog.

We’ve created a blog format that allows you to participate in a comments section with myself and other readers.  This will become a community of hunters learning from hunters.  

So join in, as we teach, learn, and inspire— after all, isn’t that what Rokslide’s about?

Be sure to “Subscribe to blog” at the link under Fitness/Other upper right.

Also, feel free to tell us what topics, etc. you’d like to see covered in the Rok Blog in the comments section below.

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"Circa October, 1977; Southeast Idaho. My dad 
(off my right shoulder), and uncles Mark and Scott,
"looking for the big one."

 

                 

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Robby Denning
Robby Denning started hunting mule deer in the late 1970’s, only missing one season in 35 years. At 25, he gave up the pursuit of all other big-game to focus on taking the best bucks possible. He began hunting the West on a DIY budget hunting an average of 30 days a year for mule deer. Robby loves the hunt as much as the kill and the entire process from research to scouting to hunting. He’s killed four bucks over 200 inches in the last 15 seasons, mostly on easily-obtained tags. He owns a public-land scouting service and runs a private-land outfitting business helping other hunters in their pursuit of deer and elk. Robby has scouted and hunted literally thousands of square miles of mule deer country and brings a wealth of knowledge about these experiences with him. To him, the weapon of choice is just a means-to-an-end and will hunt with bow, rifle, or muzzleloader – whatever it takes to create an opportunity to take a great mule deer. He is also the author of "Hunting Big Mule Deer" available on Amazon. Robby believes all of creation is from God for man to manage, respect, and through which to know its Creator

5 COMMENTS

  1. Hey Robby can’t wait to read and learn from you and who ever else joins in. In regards gossiping and criticisms to become a better person we have to learn from our mistakes and that of others. We all have done things at time or another we just have to remember that what goes around comes back around. Some laws may seem dumb but if we follow them at least we have the personal satisfaction of knowing we did it the right way. I try to teach my boys that just because nobody is watching doesn’t mean that you can do it. Always be true to yourself and others and everything will Turn out for the best. Just my thoughts.

  2. Hey Robby,
    Is there anything out there you would recommend even if its more money, that has greater magnification than the nice vortex binoculars you wrote about but is still a binocular and can be used for glassing?

  3. Hi Matthew, I assume you meant to post this in the Vortex 15×56 bino thread? I’ll answer here and on that blog post located here:
    https://www.rokslide.com/follow-the-live-hunts-win-the-vortex-15×56-binocular
    Vortex also makes a 20X bino in their Kaibab Line. I haven’t used them, but based on the good experience I’m having with these Vultures, I’d feel good about recommending them. Remember though, that by going to 20x, you’re losing a little bit of light-gathering ability as they did not increase the objective lens size along with the magnification. Here is their link: http://www.vortexoptics.com/category/kaibab_binoculars

    You asked about using them for glassing? I think you meant without a tripod? No, you won’t want to use these without a tripod. Too much magnification for that.

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